Medicines

Breakthrough research reveals why some Covid patients may die from the disease

The number of Covid cases in the UK has risen 12% this week, but while some people may be hospitalized, others will suffer little more than a loss of smell. London Medical Laboratory says new research is now revealing everyone’s immune system is as unique as their fingerprint.

Dr Quinton Fivelman PhD, Chief Scientific Officer at London Medical Laboratory says over 82% of UK adults have now received two jabs, but that doesn’t mean everyone will be saved from the worst effects of the virus. New research is revealing why some Covid patients may still die from the disease, while others barely know they have had it.

Dr. Fivelman has authored the White Paper ‘Has your vaccine worked? Are you immune to Covid-19?’. He says that, though the number of deaths and hospitalisations has reduced significantly for fully vaccinated people, new research has determined that everyone’s immune system is unique, and some individuals will still become very ill with the disease.

Says Dr Fivelman: ‘Everyone’s immune system is different. Our antibody testing has shown everyone responds differently to vaccinations. Some people create a very effective immune response, while others fail to do so.

‘We now believe that everyone’s antibody profile is as unique as their fingerprint. Exactly how many different antibodies are in our blood at any one time was previously unknown; many scientists estimated it to be over several billion. In fact, we now know most people, whether sick or well, have just a few tens to hundreds of distinct antibodies present at high concentrations.

‘London Medical Laboratory’s own tests have revealed a growing number of people who have been jabbed now have lower values (50 to 500 AU/ml) of antibodies. If someone takes a test and their score is low, their unique immune system may not have responded as well as other peoples’ to the vaccine, and their antibody levels may have significantly declined over time. That means they may be more susceptible to the virus as time passes.

‘Our findings are supported by new research from Professor Albert J.R. Heck, Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University. Using mass spectrometry, his team measured antibody profiles in about 100 people, including Covid-19 patients and people receiving different Covid vaccines.

They did not find the same antibodies in any individuals, even if they had received the same vaccine. The team found that, even though the differences in antibodies are small, it appears that this can have a significant impact. If someone makes antibodies that are less effective at killing the disease, then they may suffer more severe symptoms, or catch Covid again within a short time.

The results also showed that every individual’s concentrations of these antibodies changed in a unique way during illness or after a vaccination. This certainly helps to explain why some people become more ill from Covid-19 than others.

We already know that the jab doesn’t work for everyone. 1 in 100 fully vaccinated people fail to develop any antibodies at all after vaccination. That means that, even if every UK adult is vaccinated, half a million adults will have no protection whatsoever, and not even realize. Identifying those people is crucial, which is why widespread antibody testing is vital.

‘If anyone is concerned about their own immune response to the jabs and how well they continue to produce antibodies, the new generation blood tests we offer are highly accurate, quick and simple to carry out, either in their own home or at a clinic. These tests are available privately for those who don’t qualify for the Government’s new limited testing programme.

Journal reference:

Bondt, A., et al. (2021) Human plasma IgG1 repertoires are simple, unique, and dynamic. Cell Systems. doi.org/10.1016/j.cels.2021.08.008.

Content Source: https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211004/Breakthrough-research-reveals-why-some-Covid-patients-may-die-from-the-disease.aspx

Gemma Wilson

Gemma is a journalism graduate with keen interest in covering business news – specifically startups. She has as a keen eye for technologies and has predicted quite a few successful startups over the last couple of years.

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